Spring Courses and Workshop will be held in the City of Hollwood, Florida 4/10-13/2012

MORE INFO HERE: http://fipaonline.com/training.htm

IP certification level A, B & C and Fats, Oils and Grease (FOG) Inspector classes will be available Tuesday through Thursday and our Friday workshop will cover a wide variety of topics of interest to both municipal  and private sector wastewater and IP Professionals.

Training classes, discussions and presentations are led by FIPA Certified Instructors, knowledgeable members and subject matter experts from outside of our organization.  Our workshops and classes depend on the participation of our members and wouldn’t be possible without our sponsors.  Mark your calendars now and plan to attend this event.  Please support our sponsors by visiting our sponsor page and the sponsor area at our events. http://fipaonline.com/sponsors.htm

Workshop

Speaking of the Workshop the anticipation is almost too much.  I can hardly wait!  I am SO excited about the spring 2012 Workshop. It is going to be in Hollywood FL, April 13, 2012!!!!

Course Information

Member requests have come in for a refresher course.  For a limited time members can retake any FIPA course that they have already taken for free.  Members seeking CEU’s are asked to cover the CEU cost of $20.00. If you would like another manual the cost will be $30.00.

The Education Committee has also received member suggestions to break the FOG course down into two sessions, FOG I and FOG II.  FOG I will focus on inspections.  FOG II will consist of a detailed review of FOG chemistry, and FOG Program Management.  Successful completion of with a passing grade in FOG I is a prerequisite for FOG II.

CORE Week Info

CORE is holding a cooking oil competition.  The CORE committee has been working so hard on making this a success.  This will be the first FIPA sponsored Semi-Annual Residential Cooking Oil Collection Competition!

The municipality that collects the most residential cooking oil during Environmental Education Week, April 15-21, 2012, will be awarded for their hard work.  The CORE award will be presented to the winning municipality at a local Commission meeting.  The winning municipality will also receive recognition at the Fall FIPA Workshop and two free workshop registrations

Read more about CORE: http://core.fipaonline.com/

Tour of Grassy Waters Preserve the day before the Workshop

Workshop and a Tour… What a deal. $ 40.00 Members, $70.00 Non Members.

Tour of Grassy Waters Preserve If you missed the Tour of Grassy Waters Preserve in 2009 I have good news for you!  You spoke.  We listened.  That is right.  We are bringing it back just for you.  The best part is that a paid Workshop registration makes you eligible for the tour.  This Grassy Waters Airboat tour gives you a behind the scenes view of scientifically managed wetlands.  Water from the preserve is primary source of drinking water for several townships in Palm Beach County serving over 130,000 people.  In addition to the Airboat tour the preserve has nature center pavilions, a meandering boardwalk, trails, hiking, canoeing, educational programs and entertainment.  The Airboat tour is not open to the general public.  You don’t want to miss this tour.  Register for the Workshop today!   Mark your calendar for the Airboat Tour of Grassy Waters Preserve: April 12, 2012 at 1:00 p.m. Address: 8264 Northlake Blvd West Palm Beach, FL 33412 (Please arrive at least 1/2 hour early to ensure your seat on the Airboat.) For Directions and additional information please visit the website: http://www.wpb.org/grassywaters/ About Grassy Waters: Grassy Waters Preserve is a 23 square mile wetlands ecosystem that serves as the freshwater supply for the City of West Palm Beach and the towns of South Palm Beach and Palm Beach Island. Historically, Grassy Waters was both a key component of the Greater Everglades watershed and the headwaters of the Northwest Fork of the Loxahatchee River. The continued pristine beauty of Grassy Waters Preserve is thanks to the Department of Public Utilities Watershed Management Division. The Watershed Management Division is dedicated to protect, preserve and restore the ecological integrity of Grassy Waters Preserve by preventing the proliferation of invasive species, promoting best management practices in water quality and conservation, and educating the public about the importance of this ecosystem. Pretreatment is an important part of preserving Grassy Waters.  As a component of the NPDES Permit Program Pretreatment regulates industrial users and ensures compliance with water quality standards to protect the East Central Regional Water Reclamation Facility (ECR).  ECR employs a very unique effluent treatment process called Advanced Water Treatment (AWT).  This highly specialized AWT process allows for effluent discharge which in turn provides water replenishment to wetlands (Grassy Waters) which is the primary water source for the City of West Palm Beach.

Sign up here: http://fipaonline.com/training.htm

FIPA Spring 2012 Classes and Workshop will be in Hollywood, FL during the week of April 13th.

IP certification level A, B & C and Fats, Oils and Grease (FOG) Inspector classes will be available Tuesday through Thursday and our Friday workshop will cover a wide variety of topics of interest to both municipal  and private sector wastewater and IP Professionals.  Training classes, discussions and presentations are led by FIPA Certified Instructors, knowledgeable members and subject matter experts from outside of our organization.  Our workshops and classes depend on the participation of our members and wouldn’t be possible without our sponsors.  Mark your calendars now and plan to attend this event.  Please support our sponsors by visiting our sponsor page and the sponsor area at our events.

Read More: http://fipaonline.com/training.htm

CORE Week

By: FIPA News

CORE is excited to announce the first Semi-Annual Residential Cooking Oil Collection Competition!

The municipality that collects the most residential cooking oil during Environmental Education Week, April 15-21, 2012, will receive an award. The award will be presented to the winning municipality at a local Commission meeting.  The winning municipality will also receive recognition at the Fall FIPA Workshop and two free workshop registrations. 

Submit your volume of used cooking oil collected during the week of April 15-21 to fipasecretary@mail.com.  Volumes submitted must be received by April 25, 2012, in order to qualify for the competition.  Resources are available to assist you with oil collection service providers in your area as well as guidance you can use to help you with setting up your event.  CORE resources are available to you by visiting, www.core.fipaonline.com

Biodiesel By Products

By Lex Wahl, Pretreatment Coordinator, Panama City

Many municipalities have adopted a fats, oils and grease programs to protect collection systems and prevent sanitary sewer overflows.  You have heard of CORE, right?  (FIPA’s model Cooking Oil Recycling Effort.) This program, and others, are very well intentioned. On the surface recycling used cooking oil seems like a win-win program. Recycling keeps a good bit of fats, oil and grease out of wastewater collection systems ensuring that wastewater facilities are protected from products they cannot treat and all is well. Correct? Well, not so fast!!!

 

The purpose of this article is to address the primary application for which used cooking oil is collected, the production of bio-diesel fuel, and by products there from. Due to the escalating cost of petroleum based fuel biodiesel production has become in vogue both in large production facilities and as well as casual pastime for the backyard, do-it-yourself mechanic.  Bio-diesel is a renewable fuel that can be used in place of or in addition to petroleum based diesel fuel.

 

Bio-diesel manufacturing, in many cases, uses transesterification, which involves the mixing of natural vegetable oils or animal fats with an alcohol in the presence of a catalyst and is heated in a reactor (still) to produce biodiesel, and byproducts like glycerin

According to Biodiesel Magazine the US glycerin market is overflowing. At one time glycerin fetched a price of 20 to 25 cents per pound. Thanks to biodiesel sellers are lucky to get 5 cents per pound for glycerin today.

There are a few other things you should know about glycerin. Although sometimes considered environmentally friendly and non-toxic glycerin has a tremendous biological oxygen demand. BOD concentrations of 4,500—to 35,000 mg/l have been observed. Glycerin acts as a surfactant. Some plant operators have reported poor clarifier performance as a result of the presence of glycerin.  Due to the density and viscosity properties of glycerin WWFs may experience interference if enough glycerin finds its way into the collection system.

Operators that have been victimized by glycerin dumping complain of the inability to raise dissolved oxygen (DO) in the reactors during React/Fill cycles of Sequencing Batch Reactors and observe very little increase in DO during the React cycle. Operators also complain of a “white milky substance in the supernatant with some foaming.” White, opaque coatings of film have been observed on the crystalline sleeves protecting Ultra Violet (UV) lamps which can render UV disinfection ineffective. The usual suspect, glycerin.  Larger WWFs may never feel the effects of glycerin.  Smaller plants like those featured under “Spot Light,” are likely to feel the sting.